Bread of the Month: Mastering great garlic bread

I’ve eaten a lot of good garlic bread, even making some myself (often an herb-infused-in-olive oil version), but I had not eaten GREAT garlic bread until I sat down at the table of Liboria Salerno (for more about her, please see blog entry, “Presenting Pavlova to a ballerina” of 6/16). The bread was toasted to . . . → Read More: Bread of the Month: Mastering great garlic bread

Guest Kitchen: Presenting Pavlova to a ballerina

When I first began conversing with Al Dente Floyd at work, he gave me his mother’s phone number, saying, “Since you do the food thing, you might want to talk to her — she has a lot of recipes.”

But, he admonished, “Whatever you do, DON’T talk to her about the ballet.”

What?!?!

Al Dente . . . → Read More: Guest Kitchen: Presenting Pavlova to a ballerina

Ripening the palate with gazpacho

The tomatoes have been long-coming this year. It’s typical in this climate, which tends to be cooler than tomatoes would like. Still, we want our tomatoes. We plant them and wait, and long months later, we begin to see red.

With anticipation comes longing. As I waited out my slow-growing Roma and Better Boy . . . → Read More: Ripening the palate with gazpacho

Springing forward with mushrooms, leeks

Spring heralds with it certain tastes, pushing up like new grass in a warming earth. I find myself craving mushrooms, and I know why. Years ago, our springs were spent in pursuit of them in the wild. While other families played miniature golf, we scavenged the brush- and tree-clotted timber, looking for the gold . . . → Read More: Springing forward with mushrooms, leeks

Picking a perky pesto

I first learned of nasturtiums several years ago when they were included in a planned herb garden kit. The seeds were large and legume-like, similar — to me, at least — to garbanzo beans. I planted them, along with parsley, thyme, borage, sage, etc., having little to no idea of what to expect.

Years hence, . . . → Read More: Picking a perky pesto