Bread of the Month: Beckoning Halloween history with Irish barmbrack

“They had colcannon, and the funniest things were found in it — tiny dolls, mice, a pig made of china, silver sixpences, a thimble, a ring, and lots of other things. After supper was over all went into the big play-room, and dived for apples in a tub of water, fished for prizes in . . . → Read More: Bread of the Month: Beckoning Halloween history with Irish barmbrack

Bread of the Month: Tugging at “Babka’s” skirt

I anticipate my monthly bread adventures the way others look forward to road trips or nights on the town. I enjoy those things, too, but the plotting and planning of a bread-baking day has my mind aswirl and my excitement on the rise, especially when I embark on a recipe that is new. I see . . . → Read More: Bread of the Month: Tugging at “Babka’s” skirt

Handling pies of petite proportions

As stone fruits, berries and even apples come into season (their true season), one realizes it is also the dawning of pie season. We tend to link pies to Thanksgiving most often, but it is the heart of summertime that pies, made bursting with fresh fruit in season, are at their zenith of flavor . . . → Read More: Handling pies of petite proportions

Bread of the Month: Waiting out a storied Panettone

This blog is devoted to certain recipes, tried and true; others, brand new. I love to try something I’ve never done before. The bread-of-the-month adventure reflects this, and with the end of 2013, I approached making a holiday bread I’d eaten many times but never made myself. Each holiday season and in fact, in certain . . . → Read More: Bread of the Month: Waiting out a storied Panettone

Jamming with ripe berries

Back in the day, which is really only an arm-length back, a generation or two, ladies “put up” vegetables and fruits in an ongoing summertime ritual as the produce came to fruition in their gardens and orchards. By fall, cellar shelves were agleam with shining jars of jewel colors, the “fruit” of their efforts. . . . → Read More: Jamming with ripe berries

Bread of the Month: Honoring Christmas tradition with Stollen

Many regions boast a bread that is specific to the holidays. The Italians have Panettone, a tall, slightly sweet yeast bread dotted with dried or candied fruits. The Swedish have Lucia Buns, s-shaped twists spiced with saffron and cardamom, served in honor of St. Lucia. The Germans have a curious dense loaf called Stollen, which . . . → Read More: Bread of the Month: Honoring Christmas tradition with Stollen

Flipping for apple turnovers

As we head into fall and the light shifts to a beautiful golden slant, the air takes on a heady and romantic quality, and the leaves on the trees begin to rattle toward looseness, I think of turning over a new leaf. And as I think of that, naturally, I think of…turnovers.

To some, that . . . → Read More: Flipping for apple turnovers

Weaving a lattice for a dried cherry pie

Lest you all begin to sniff that writing about a cherry pie in August (that was actually made in late July) is a tad off-season (and I can hear you sniffing, so don’t pretend you are not), let me tell you a little of how the Siouan peoples described a couple of their summer months . . . → Read More: Weaving a lattice for a dried cherry pie

Taking a foray into sorbet

Time was – and maybe for some still is, making homemade ice cream was a near daylong feat of strength. This ordeal involved a huge contraption with a hand crank; a 50-pound bag of something called rock salt, a clear to grayish gravel that had the diametrical abilities to both melt snow on the highway . . . → Read More: Taking a foray into sorbet

Telling of two strawberry tarts

I’ve become quite fond of mini desserts. Diminishing the size of a sweet also reduces the guilt, and there is actually ample satisfaction in just one bite. Plus, a mini donut, cake or pie is just so darn cute. I believe this has something to do with the recent cupcake craze…cake, by the cup, is . . . → Read More: Telling of two strawberry tarts